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The Chopper by Brenda Williams
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Small Sailboats Are Fun
The 2010 Toyota Corolla Offers a Big Bang For Your Buck
Talon Body Kits - Install And See The Difference
Suzuki GSX-R1000K9 Road Test
Steering and Suspension System Auto Parts
South Carolina Hyundai of Greer the Best Place
2010 Buick Lacrosse VS. Preconceptions


  Suzuki GSX-R1000K9 Road Test

If there was ever a bike that's easy to misunderstand it's the latest GSX-R1000. It's specification sheet and, perhaps more importantly its ‘GSX-R' name tag, give the impression of a beast that only experts should apply for. The reality is far different, and the Suzuki can be ridden safely by far more people, and in a much wider variety of circumstances than you'd think.

It's more real world identity isn't that obvious from a quick glance of the bike's racy-looking style. Garish and bright coloured bodywork also has the silhouette of a competition bike. And first impressions suggest more than a few miles in its seat would lead to some fairly serious physical and mental strain. Add the fact that the GSX-R is already competing well in the WSB championship and few would challenge the view that the 1000 has been designed with one priority in mind - speed, and lots of it.

Swing your leg over it though, and nestle into the relatively roomy riding position and your opinion is bound to change. There's no need whatsoever to make any sacrifices to comfort. Neither limbs nor neck feel they've been asked to contort themselves in any way to fit the bike. OK, it's no Goldwing, but neither is it something only a gymnast would feel at home on. I personally would be happy to ride all the way to Scotland and back on the Suzuki. I'd prefer it if the journey was predominantly dry and I didn't need to carry too much luggage. Though in saying that, the fairing does at least give some decent enough shelter and a tank bag could swallow a fair few essentials to make the trip more bearable. For a long single day's ride, only the most luxury-needy would find fault. There's even a chance to adjust the two-position footrests to aid the civility further.

Civilised is not an apt description for the pillion accommodation mind you. High footrests force much knee-bending, and the seat is too small to give the same support as the rider's. Its high elevation means the passenger towers above the relatively prone rider catching the wind and making the whole experience one to forget, even after little.

However, that's about it when it comes to criticism of the bike's refinement. And that's pretty much the case however you ride it. Suzuki's designers and engineers definitely had you, the road rider, in mind just as much as the likes of BSB star Sylvain Guintoli when they set about building this bike autel maxidas ds808.

The engine is one very good example of this. Of course as a 1000cc sportsbike, unsurprisingly it has huge power, with an output claimed to be over 180bhp. In the right circumstances that's enough to send the Suzuki to a top speed of over 180mph. But the beauty of the in-line four cylinder motor is the way that horsepower is produced - in a very smooth and linear fashion. With perfect fuelling to aid the good manners, the engine is as progressive and user-friendly as it gets. It's entirely up to the rider to decide just how quickly he wants to gain speed. With the right sort of discipline there's absolutely no need to feel intimidated by this bike. Only if you're irresponsible with it will it stand a chance of biting you. The only thing to be wary of is the deceptive nature of the acceleration. Being as unstressed as it is, the engine will pull cleanly in top gear from as little as 2000rpm, and it doesn't take long before the digital speedo's figures start to climb high and fast without you realising it. Keeping a beady eye on the numbers it's displaying is crucial.

Though there's plenty of real excitement from using the engine a bit harder, it really is a joy to use it in a more relaxed fashion too. The motor has tons of torque and can be kept at lower rpm by short-shifting through the gearbox and yet still produce more than enough speed. Adding to its choice of delivery is the three-stage power switch which alters the mapping of the engine to reduce its potential should it worry you in any way. I personally think it's a bit of a novelty really, as the engine is already well-mannered enough to be governed by the use of the throttle alone. But there may well be others who appreciate it more. The good thing is the choice. Whichever way you decide to use the engine, there'll be nothing the chassis can't handle more than capably.

With overall dimensions mid-way between the Honda Fireblade and Yamaha R1, the Suzuki is a light and very easy bike to master and doesn't need much in the way of physical persuasion to push it through corners. Nice light steering aids this sort of move and the chassis geometry helps you to hold your chosen line or tighten it still further more than readily.

With excellent support and feedback from the suspension, confidence remains high at all times. Not many riders have greater ability than this bike. The Suzuki's new BPF Big Piston Forks are especially competent and their design allows a nice supple and comfortable ride over bumpy surfaces yet plenty of support when they're being tested by hard braking. They're more compliant when they're loaded by greater speed or cornering forces, though with such a wide range of adjustment, including high and low speed compression adjusters, few riders won't be able to tune the forks to suit them best. The new 2009 Kawasaki ZX-6R is the only other production bike to feature BPF forks at the moment, though I'd expect them fitted to many more machines in the near future autel maxisys ms906 review.

They allow you to use the best of the powerful but predictable new ‘monobloc' brake calipers thanks to their more finely controlled action which gives the front tyre a better chance of finding the best grip available. And like the engine, though the stoppers' performance potential is high, thanks to the friendly way it's delivered, there's no need to worry about trying to sample a lot of it.

It's yet another aspect of the bike which shows very clearly than the GSX-R is more than just a one trick pony. Sportsbikes have come a long way in terms of their versatility in recent years and the Suzuki is a very good example of this. Its balance and predictability make it suitable for a variety of roles and certainly shouldn't be thought of as a savage unusable animal liable to land you in trouble on the first ride.

SPECIFICATIONS

SUZUKI GSX-R1000 K9

ENGINE

Type: 999cc, liquid cooled, sixteen-valve, dohc, inline four

Maximum power: 182bhp @ 12,000rpm

Maximum torque: 82lb/ft @ 9,200rpm

TRANSMISSION

Transmission: six speed

Final drive: chain

CHASSIS/COMPONENTS

Frame: allloy twin spar

Suspension:

Front: 43mm inverted BPF telescopic fork, fully adjustable

Rear: rising rate monoshock, fully adjustable

Brakes:

Front: twin 310mm discs with four-piston radial calipers

Rear: single 220mm disc with twin-piston caliper

Tyres:

Front: 120/70 -17

Rear: 190/50 -17

DIMENSIONS/CAPACITY

Seat height: 810mm

Wheelbase: 1405mm

Claimed wet weight: 203kg

Fuel capacity: 17.5 litres

DETAILS:

Price: £9,800

Contact: 0845 850 8800, www.suzuki-gb.co.uk

MOTORCYCLE journalist extraordinaire and one of the most respected bike testers in the business Chris 'Mossy' Moss supplies reviews of the latest motorbikes on CIA Motorcycle Insurance.

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Message déposé le 07.06.2017 à 09:00 - Commentaires (0)




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Tous les messages
Truck Driver Jobs
Treat Yourself to Plastic Bumper Repair
Transmission Control
Toyota Supra Mark III
Top Water For Fuel And HHO Kits - Water4gas Review
Top 5 Cars at Lowest Cost and Highest Mileage in India
Tips to Washing Your Car
Tips on How to Prolong the Life of an Automobile
Tips For Handling An Automobile Collision
Three Tips About Buying Repossessed Cars at Car Auctions
Things To Consider When Choosing Car Rental Service Providers
The Use of Car CD-DVD Note
The Steam Car Phenomenon
The Real Cost Of Your Car
The New Lexus GS is More Than Just a Car
The Inception
The Great Australian Road Trip - Navigating Our Tough Terrain
The Easiest Way To Find Used Car Finance Options
The Chopper by Brenda Williams
The Benefits of Fuel Efficient Cars
Small Sailboats Are Fun
The 2010 Toyota Corolla Offers a Big Bang For Your Buck
Talon Body Kits - Install And See The Difference
Suzuki GSX-R1000K9 Road Test
Steering and Suspension System Auto Parts
South Carolina Hyundai of Greer the Best Place
2010 Buick Lacrosse VS. Preconceptions


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